Free Wildlife Awareness and How to use Bear Spray workshops in Sparwood and Fernie this week

Wildlife Awareness and Safe use of Bear Spray Workshops in Fernie and Sparwood

Sparwood: Tuesday July 28 at 5 pm Fiorentino’s Parking Area, Highway 3, Sparwood

Fernie:  Wednesday July 29 at 5pm, Fernie Info Centre on Highway 3, Fernie

 Come along and learn how to respond to wildlife encounters and get hands on experience using inert bear spray (like the real thing but without the sting of the pepper).  The safest wildlife encounter is one prevented.

Having bear spray accessible and knowing how to use it will give you the confidence to do the right thing.   Stay calm, assess the situation, respond accordingly and not give in to the instinct to run, which can trigger the chase instinct.  Bear spray has been determined to be an effective deterrent that can reduce injury and potentially safe your life. Like a seat belt, it should be considered essential safety equipment when travelling in wildlife country.

Free of charge.  For more information and to register contact the WildSafeBC Coordinator, fernie@wildsafebc.com

Basic RGB

 

 

 

Bear and moose sightings reported on Fernie trails over the weekend

Bear sightings reported by the boardwalks on Ecoterrorism, Forever trail in Montane and on the Coal Discovery Trail and moose reported by the P9 and Lazy Lizard Junction over the weekend.bears-and-bikes-screenshot

Make noise to warn wildlife of your presence and avoid surprise encounters, especially around blind corners and berry bushes.  Join us on Wednesday at the Fernie Info Centre at 5 pm to learn how to respond to wildlife encounters and safe use of bear spray.

Wildlife Awareness and Safe use of Bear Spray Workshops in Fernie and Sparwood next week

Sparwood: Tuesday July 28 at 5 pm Fiorentino’s Parking Area, Highway 3, Sparwood

Fernie:  Wednesday July 29 at 5pm, Fernie Info Centre on Highway 3, Fernie

Basic RGBCome along and learn how to respond to wildlife encounters and get hands on experience using inert bear spray (like the real thing but without the sting of the pepper).  The safest wildlife encounter is one prevented.

Having bear spray accessible and knowing how to use it will give you the confidence to do the right thing.   Stay calm, assess the situation, respond accordingly and not give in to the instinct to run, which can trigger the chase instinct.  Bear spray has been determined to be an effective deterrent that can reduce injury and potentially safe your life. Like a seat belt, it should be considered essential safety equipment when travelling in wildlife country.

Free of charge.  For more information and to register contact the WildSafeBC Coordinator, fernie@wildsafebc.com

Are you planning to Camp in Grizzly Bear Country

“Bare” Campsites are Safe Campsites

Do:

• Store food in lockers provided or in trunk of vehicle.
• Keep camping area clean and free of garbage.
• Dispose of grey water in designated area.
• Read and follow any notices posted by campground attendants.

Don’t:

• Store food, soaps, toothpaste or other aromatic items in, or near, your tent.
• Cook near your sleeping area.
• Feed ANY wildlife – ever!
• Leave food in your camping area unattended.

For more information on camping in Bear Country and Bear Safety visit https://wildsafebc.com/learn/camping/

Grizzly-bear_camping_logo-01-1024x768

Dumping of meat scraps on the powerline in Sparwood

Dumping meat scraps will attract wildlife and jeapordize the safety of people recreating nearby. This pile of meat bones was dumped on the Sparwood Powerline a few days ago! One of my volunteers for the South Rockies Grizzly Bear Project came accross this when he was out checking rub trees for grizzly bear hair samples.

If you see anyone illegally dumping please call the RAPP line on 1-877-952-7277. Thank you.

dumping

A previously captured and relocated bear had to be destroyed in the Elk Valley

A food-conditioned cinnamon-coloured black bear was destroyed by the Conservation Officer Service on June 28. This bear had been previously captured outside the community and relocated. It eventually made its way to Elkford and began repeating previous food-conditioned behaviour and was accessing garbage left outdoors. A resident was issued a violation ticket under the BC Wildlife Act for attracting dangerous wildlife to their property with unsecured attractants.

WildSafeBC urges the public to secure their garbage and food to avoid teaching bears to associate humans with sources of food. Food-conditioned bears are more likely to get into conflict with people and be a potential safety risk in the community. For more information on how to keep bears and other wildlife wild, please visit https://wildsafebc.com/species/black-bear/

Bear Carrying Garbage - Kirk Friederich