Bear Showing Aggressive Behaviour Reported on Red Cedar Drive in Sparwood

June 12.  A black bear has been reported showing aggressive behaviour on Cedar Drive in Sparwood the last few days.

     If you encounter a Bear:

STAY CALM AND DO NOT RUN

Let the bear know you are human (arms out to side)

Use your voice in a calm, assertive manner.

Back away slowly and allow the bear an escape route

Never turn your back on wildlife

Do not approach or feed wildlife

Call the Conservation Officer Service on 1-877-952-7277 to report human/wildlife conflict.

blackiie 1

Bears reported rumaging through plastic bags (recycling and garbage) on 4th Avenue in Fernie

Monday June 11.  Bears have been reported late at night over the weekend on 4th avenue, between 8 and 9th street.  They were heard rumaging through plastic bags.  If you don’t want bears on your property remove anything that may attract them.  This includes recycling.   Even empty garbage cans can attract bears. They are a visual cue as bears have learned that these containers may have residue odor and contain food!

Thanks for helping keep bears wild and people safe!

Bear Carrying Garbage - Kirk Friederich

 

Off leash dogs reported chasing moose in the Annex Park Fernie

Dogs and Moose don’t Mix.  Moose Safety tips

  • A moose can seriously injure or kill a dog if it feels threatened. Likewise, loose dogs can harass moose, causing undue stress. Never let your dog out if there is a moose in your yard.
  • Use caution when walking dogs, keep them under voice control and/or leash.  Dogs chasing wildlife may result in human/wildlife conflict.
  • Moose are wild animals and need to be given space and privacy. Never approach a moose. Give the animals a wide berth and ensure they always have an escape route.
  • Female moose with calves need extra space. Moose cows are very protective of their young and may attack if they perceive a threat. If you come across a cow and calf, calmly leave the area immediately.
  • Be aware of moose body language. A threatened moose may lower its head and flatten its ears before charging. If you see these behaviours, find an escape route.
  • If a moose does charge you, getting inside a nearby building or car is the safest option, but hiding behind a large tree or other solid object may effectively block the charge.

For more information on moose and wildlife go to www.wildsafebc.commoose and calves

 

 

 

 

Learn how to use bear spray today Wednesday June 5th at 6pm at the Fernie Bike park gazebo

Come along and learn how to respond to wildlife encounters and get hands on experience using inert bear spray (like the real thing but without the sting of the pepper).  Wednesday June 5th at 6pm at the bike park gazebo behind the aquatic centre just before the FWOW ride.  Please be on time.

The safest wildlife encounter is one prevented.  Having bear spray accessible and knowing how to use it will give you the confidence to do the right thing (stay calm, assess the situation and respond accordingly) and not give in to the instinct to run (which can invoke the chase instinct).

Bear spray has been determined to be an effective deterrent that can reduce injury and potentially save your life. Like a seat belt, it should be considered essential safety equipment when travelling in wildlife country.

For more information on how to safety use bear spray go to www.wildsafebc.com

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Ridgemont resident fined by Conservation Officer for putting garbage out the night before. Bears in Ridgemont and on 4th ave in Fernie.

May 31st.  Fernie garbage cans are not bear resistant and must be kept indoors and locked up.  The garbage cart in this picture was left outdoors in Ridgemont and accessible to bears.  The bear pried it open and proceeded to enjoy the buffet of food laid out for him.  The Ridgemont resident was issued a fine by the Conservation Officer Service.

At a glance, 40% of households keep the garbage cart (often sitting just outside the garage) baiting bears into town. Everyone comments, JUST FINE THEM!  Absolutely!  Here is the process:  Bylaw enforcement is complaint driven.  Bylaw Services will follow up when complaints are made. Go to the City of Fernie website and hit the tab “I want to report a problem or request service.”  Here is the link.  http://www.fernie.ca/EN/main/city/report-problem-request-service.html  The information remains confidential, will provide evidence and documentation and authorities can then follow up.  Thanks for helping us and reporting anyone who is attracting bears into town with garbage outdoors.

Complying with bylaws and removing wildlife attractants will result in a cleaner and safer community and prevent the needless destruction of bears that come into conflict with people. fernie bin damge_LI

The “problem bear” that we created had to be destroyed in Fernie a few days ago.

The 2 year old brown colored black female bear in this picture had to be destroyed in the Airport subdivision in Fernie earlier this week.  The human food conditioned and habituated bear had a history of accessing garbage, causing property damage (destroyed a City of Fernie garbage container), tore down bird feeders and was found to be a threat to human safety.  We (anyone with garbage left outdoors, bird feeders and other attractants) must hold ourselves personally responsible for contributing to the death of this bear and jeopardizing the safety of this community.

City of Fernie Bylaw Services, the Conservation Officer Service and WildSafeBC investigated the area to determine who is attracting dangerous wildlife to the area.  Over 30 notices were issued to people with garbage outdoors, a dozen personal contacts were made, 3 Bylaw warnings were issued and the Conservation Officer Service will be following up with a Dangerous Wildlife Protection Order, $575 fine if the attractants aren’t cleaned up.

Removing bears won’t solve the problem.  As long as the garbage and bird feeders are there, other bears will move in.  Garbage is everyone’s responsibility, keep it locked up.

For more information go to www.wildsafebc.combrown bear 2 yr Fernie

Grizzly bear sighting update for Park Lane Fernie

Grizzly bear sightings in the Park Lane area were reported to the Conservation Officers first thing yesterday, May 27.  It has been confirmed that the brown colored bear is indeed a black bear, not a grizzly bear.  Brown colored black bears are often mistaken for grizzly bears.  Refer to the pictures in this post to help you tell the difference between black and grizzly bears.  However, whether it is a black or grizzly bear, please make make every effort possible to bear-proof your property.  Bears accessing garbage and bird feeders may result in human/wildlife conflict.

grizzly traits

black bear traits

 

Grizzly bear and cub currently in the Park Lane Area in Fernie

May 27.  A grizzly bear and cub are currently in the Park Lane Area in FernieSpawood grizzly sherry.  The Conservation Officer Service is requesting that you do not approach the bears and stay indoors if the bears are on your property.

If you encounter a bear, stop, stay calm, speak in a low voice to identify yourself as human and not prey, back away slowly and leave the bear an escapre route.

Report human/wildlife conflict.  1-877-952-7277

Mountain biker bluff charged by bear and cubs on the weekend in Fernie

Abears-and-bikes-screenshot mountain biker was bluff charged when she surprised a black bear and cubs at close range when out biking on Swine Flu trail on the weekend.  This is normal defensive behaviour for a bear defending her cubs, space of food source.  Are you prepared for your hike or ride in bear country?

The safest wildlife encounter is one prevented. Making noise to warn wildlife of your presence and having bear spray accessible and knowing how to use it will give you the confidence to do the right thing.   Stay calm, assess the situation, respond accordingly and not give in to the instinct to run (which can invoke the chase instinct).

Bear spray has been determined to be an effective deterrent that can reduce injury and potentially save your life. Like a seat belt, it should be considered essential safety equipment when travelling in wildlife country.

For more information on how to safety use bear spray go to www.wildsafebc.com and watch this 33 second video to learn how to use bear spray https://vimeo.com/287472884.