Grizzly sow and cubs seen on Mt Fernie Trail

bears and bikes screenshot

Mountain bikers, your speed and quietness put you at greater risk for sudden encounters

A grizzly and two cubs were reported half way up Mt Fernie trail yesterday.  Bears will travel great distances for food and prefer the path of least resistance, trails!  Be prepared and expet to encounter wildlife anytime.  Make noise to warn wildlife of your presence, travel in groups and have bear spray accessible just in case.

Visit www.wildsafebc.com com for more safety tips.

The Lake Trail at Island Lake Lodge will be closed until further notice due to a moose cow reacting defensively to protect her calf.

Monday June 11.  After two reported incidents of a moose cow charging at hikers on the Lake Trail, the trail has been closed until further notice ( two weeeks) moose and calvesto protect the public and the moose cow and calf.  Thank you for respecting this closure.

Moose Safety Tips

  • Moose are wild animals and need to be given space and privacy. Never approach a moose. Give the animals a wide berth and ensure they always have an escape route.
  • Female moose with calves need extra space. Moose cows are very protective of their young and may attack if they perceive a threat. If you come across a cow and calf, calmly leave the area immediately.
  • Be aware of moose body language. A threatened moose may lower its head and flatten its ears before charging. If you see these behaviours, find an escape route.
  • If a moose does charge you, getting inside a nearby building or car is the safest option, but hiding behind a large tree or other solid object may effectively block the charge.
  • Dogs and moose don’t mix. A moose can seriously injure or kill a dog if it feels threatened. Likewise, loose dogs can harass moose, causing undue stress. Never let your dog out if there is a moose in your yard.
  • Use caution when walking dogs, keep them under voice control and/or leash.  Dogs chasing wildlife may result in human/wildlife conflict.

 

 

 

 

Grizzly bear and cubs at Cutts camprground at Lake Kookanusa and grizzly at the Tie LakeTransfer Station

Friday June 8.  Lake Kookanusa is grizzly bear country.  Are you going camping this weekend? Don’t keep food or toiletries in your tent, don’t cook near your sleeping area, don’t FEED any wildlife ever, Don’t leave food in your camping area unattended.

Do store food in lockers provided or the trunk of your vehicle, do keep camping area clean and free of garbage, do read and follow any notices posted by campground attnendants.

For  more information  on camping and recreation in bear country visit www.wildsafebc.comBear Picnic 2[1]

 

Bear accessing garbage on Slalom Drive and bear cub seen all over town and on Ridgemont bike trails

Wednesday June 6.  WildSafeBC and Bylaw Services have been around town in areas with current bear activity to deliver an educational message reminding people to keep garbage indoors between collection days.  We had many conversations with residents and are aware that there are many potential barriers to keeping garbage away from bears, (seniors, disabilities, no shed, no garage, no transport etc…).  We are pleased to report that many people are making great efforts and thank you.  It is up to us as a community to work together and help each other out.  We have chosen to live in bear country.

A bear was accessing garbage on Slalom Drive last night and dragging it up the bank.  Let’s hope that no one’s pet or child gets between the bear and his easy food source.  A cub has been seen all over town and on the bike trails. There is no mama bear around that we know of.

For more information on keeping wildlifeslalom drive garbage bear wild go to www.wildsafebc.com

 

If you don’t want bears on your doorstep keep your new Fernie garbage cart indoors until collection day

Garbage left under the carport, on the porch, in the backyard will attract bears to your property, jeapardize your personal safety, the safety of your negihbourhood and potentially contribute to the needless destrcution of bears.

Thank you for keeping your garbage cart indoors between collection days.  WildSafeBC and Bylaw Services will be patrolling neighborhoods this weekOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reports of people harassing moose and calf by Maiden Lake. Bears seen by the bike park gazebo and on 3rd avenue by the fire hall in Fernie.

moose and calveseenagers Teenagers were reported throwing rocks at the moose and calf behind Maiden Lake.  The area has been closed off until further notice.  Moose sightings also reported by the Fairy Creek Bridge and in James White Park.  Bears seen behind the bike park gazebo and by the Firehall.  A grizzly bear was reported by bikers at the bottom of Project 9 trail by the Lazy Lizard intersection.

Moose Safety Tips

  • Moose are wild animals and need to be given space and privacy. Never approach a moose. Give the animals a wide berth and ensure they always have an escape route.
  • Female moose with calves need extra space. Moose cows are very protective of their young and may attack if they perceive a threat. If you come across a cow and calf, calmly leave the area immediately.
  • Be aware of moose body language. A threatened moose may lower its head and flatten its ears before charging. If you see these behaviours, find an escape route.
  • If a moose does charge you, getting inside a nearby building or car is the safest option, but hiding behind a large tree or other solid object may effectively block the charge.
  • Dogs and moose don’t mix. A moose can seriously injure or kill a dog if it feels threatened. Likewise, loose dogs can harass moose, causing undue stress. Never let your dog out if there is a moose in your yard.
  • Use caution when walking dogs, keep them under voice control and/or leash.  Dogs chasing wildlife may result in human/wildlife conflict.

 

 

 

 

Grizzly bear reported at the bottom of Erics trail earlier today

A grizzly bear was reported at the bottom of Erics trail this morning.

 Hiking and Biking:  Make noise to warn bears of your presence, watch for fresh bear signs and travel in groups in daylight.  If you meet a bear, have your bear spray ready just in case, back away slowly and leave.  Do not run.  Give the bear space to escape.

For more information on grizzly bears go to www.wildsafebc.comSpawood grizzly sherry

Bears getting into garbage left outdoors by the elementary school in Fernie

Wednesday May 23.  A bear was reported getting into garbage left outdoors in the 4th avenue area right by the elemenatry school.  Long time residents thank you for leading by example and keeping garbage indoors.  If you are new to town and have chosen to live in bear country make it your responsibility to educate yourself about how to keep yourself safe and wildlife wild.

Reminder, Waste Regulation No. 1845 bylaw in Fernie requires garbage to be kept indoors between collection days.  In BC it is everyone’s responsibility to prevent attracting dangerous wildlife to thier property.  (BC Wildlife Act, Section 33.1).

We need your help to ensure compliance from everyone.  Bylaw enforcement is complaint driven and will remain anonymous.  Thank you for reporting offenders to Bylaw Services, call 250-423-6817 or go to www.fernie.ca to report online.

Thank you for helping keep our community safe and wildlife wild.  For more information go to www.wildsafebc.combear have enjoyed your garbage

Two brown colored bears seen on Cemetary Bypass Trail.

 

Tuesday May 22.  Bears seen on Cemetary Bypass Trail yesterday afternoon. Bikers, your speed and quietness put you at greater risk for sudden encounters.bear family from fernie

To stay safe on the trails, keep these tips in mind:

  • Make noise (using your voice), especially when riding through areas with poor sight lines or through berry patches.
  • Carry bear spray where you can easily reach it and know how to use it! It is best to keep the canister on your person in a hip holster to ensure you can access it when needed (as opposed to a backpack or on your bike). Check out https://vimeo.com/123217603 or search “WildSafeBC Bear Spray” on Vimeo to learn more about this deterrent.
  • Leave the dogs at home. Your chance of encountering a bear is elevated when mountain biking and off-leash dogs and bears can be a dangerous mix.
  • Stay aware of your surroundings. Are you in the middle of a huckleberry patch? Is there fresh scat on the trail? Are there off-leash dogs in the area? Is it early morning or dusk? If so, your chances of encountering a bear are elevated. Slow down and keep your eyes and ears peeled!

IF you encounter a bear:

  • Never try to run or bike away from a bear.
  • If the bear doesn’t notice you, ready your bear spray (just in case) and then slowly back out of the area, quietly.
  • If the bear sees you, ready your bear spray (just in case). Talk calmly to the bear and slowly back out of the area. Do not turn your back on the bear.
  • Bear encounters should be reported to the Conservation Officer hotline at 1-877-952-7277.