A bear was reported accessing garbage left outdoors on Slalom Drive in Fernie over the weekend.

Bear Carrying Garbage - Kirk FriederichNow that the bear has learned where to find easy food he is likely to keep moving through other parts of town looking for food. Regardless of where you live in town, keep your garbage stored indoors, bring in bird feeders until the winter, keep barbeques clean and secure all other attractants and bears will move on.

Garbage Left Outdoors is a Wildlife Attractant

Keeping garbage indoors between collection days and keeping other attractants inaccessible to wildlife is the MOST EFFECTIVE way to keep people safe, prevent property damage and avoid the unnecessary killing of bears that come into conflict with people.  Thank you for keeping your waste cart stored indoors between collection days.

Don’t have anywhere safe and secure to keep your garbage between collection days?

You have options.  Excess garbage can be taken to the Transfer Station on Highway 3 free of charge or to the bear-resistant community bins that are accessible 24/7 at the following locations:  City Hall, Max Turyk Centre, Fernie Aquatic Centre, Fernie Memorial Arena and the Fernie Mobile Home Park.

Complying with Waste Regulation Bylaw No. 1845 and the BC Wildlife Act, Section 33.1, will result in a cleaner and safer community for wildlife and people.

For more information on wildlife safety go to www.wildsafebc.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bear sightings reported by the boat launch, on Cedar Bowl Drive and Ridgemont Lane in Fernie and in Sparwood Heights

bird feederKeep your garbage stored indoors, bring in bird feeders until the winter, keep barbeques clean and secure all other attractants and bears will move on.

A bear was reported destroying a bird feeder on Cedar Bowl Drive, bear sightings reported by the Boat launch and along the dike trail towards Dogwood Park and on Ridgemont Lane.  Bears reported accessing garbage left outdoors in Sparwood Heights.

Keeping garbage stored indoors until collection day and securing wildlife attractants is the best way to keep people safe, prevent property damage, and avoid the unnecessary killing of bears that come into conflict with people.

Bottom line: Garbage, birdseed and pet food etc. attracts bears to your property making it more likely for the bear to break into your home creating a safety risk for your family and a death sentence for the bear.

For more information on wildlife safety go to www.wildsafebc.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bear and Moose sightings reported throughout Fernie trails

Be prepared and expect to encounter bears, moose and other wildlife anytime.  Bear and moose sightings reported on Stove trail yesterday.  Moose and calf by the Queen V/Sidewinder junction.  Wildlife will choose the path of least resistance to travel and are likely to move on quickly and cbears-and-bikes-screenshotover alot of ground.

Make noise to avoid surprise encounters, carry bear spray and know how to use it just in case.

For more information on wildlife safety go to www.wildsafebc.com

Grizzly bear and her cubs passing through backyards on Highline Drive in Fernie

highlone drive cubsTuesday May 15.  A grizzly bear and her cubs have been reported passing through backyards on properties on Highline Drive in Fernie Alpine Resort.  As residents in wildlife habitat it is our responsibility to prevent conflict between people, bears and other wildlife.  It is much easier to keep human food and other attractants away from wildlife in the first place, than it is to teach bears, cougars, deer, skunks and rodents to stay away from unnatural food, such as garbage that they have learned to enjoy.

Thank you for keeping garbage in a garage, shed or indoors inaccessible to bears and other wildlife. It is everyone’s responsibility in BC to prevent dangerous wildlife from accessing unnatural food on their property.  (BC Wildlife Act, Section 33.1).

Keeping garbage stored indoors, securing wildlife attractants (birdfeeders, BBQ’s, fruit trees, pet food) is the best way to keep people safe, prevent property damage, and avoid the unnecessary killing of bears that come into conflict with people.

For more information on keeping wildlife wild and communities safe visit www.wildsafebc.com

Moose and bear sightings reported on Fernie trails and in city parks

blackiie 1Monday May 14.  A bear sighting was reported on Kiddy Up yesterday and Moose sightings have been reported throughout the trail network and in James White Park and behind Maiden Lake.

Fernie is Wildlife Country.  Be prepared and expect to encounter wildlife anytime.  Make noise to avoid surprise encounters and to warn wildlife and other trail users that you are around the corner.  Carry Bear spray, have it accessible and know how to use it.

For more information on preventing encounters with wildlife visit www.wildsafebc.com

Moose sightings reported behind Maiden Lake and on Uprooted trail

Moose Safety Tips

Moose are wild animals and need to be given space and privacy. Stay safe by keeping an appropriate distance.  Moose are not normally aggressive but can be very dangerous if approached or startled, especially females with calves.  Given the sheer size and strength of these animals, moose are capable of inflicting serious injuries.

  • Never approach a moose. Give the animals a wide berth and ensure they have an escape route.
  • If a moose does charge you, getting inside a nearby building or car is the safest option, but hiding behind a large tree or other solid object may effectively block the charge.
  • Moose will attack dogs as they view them in the same category as their natural predator, the wolf. Keep your dog leashed if moose are in the area.
  • Perhaps the biggest threat that moose pose to human safety is through vehicle collisions. Protect yourself by adjusting your speed in areas where moose are known to frequent especially between dusk and dawn.

For more information on wildlfie safety visit www.wildsafebc.com

moose

moose deserve their space and privacy

 

 

Spring is the best opportunity to keep wildlife wild

As residents in wildlife habitat it is our responsibility to prevent conflict between people, bears and other wildlife.  It is much easier to keep human food and other attractants away from wildlife in the first place, than it is to teach bears, cougars, deer, skunks and rodents to stay away from unnatural food, such as garbage that they have learned to enjoy.

Thank you for keeping garbage in a garage, shed or indoors inaccessible to bears and other wildlife between collection days. It is everyone’s responsibility in BC to prevent dangerous wildlife from accessing unnatural food on their property.  (BC Wildlife Act, Section 33.1).

Keeping garbage stored indoors until collection day and securing wildlife attractants is the best way to keep people safe, prevent property damage, and avoid the unnecessary killing of bears that come into conflict with people.

WildSafeBC will be with the Bright Beginnings Daycare program in Fernie this week and with the South Country Girl Guides in Baynes Lake next week.  To book wildlife education and safety presentation for your group please contact fernie@wildsafebc.com

For more information on keeping wildlife wild and communities safe visit www.wildsafebc.combear in tree smaller

Fewer bears destroyed in the Elk Valley and South Country this year

On average since 2005, five bears per year had to be destroyed due human/wildlife conflict other than in 2015 when 22 bears were destroyed in Fernie alone.  So far in 2017, there have been no bears destroyed in Fernie.  Thank you to everyone who has made efforts to keep garbage and other attractants inaccessible to wildlife at home and prevent the needless destruction of bears and to those who have taken precautions to prevent human/wildlife conflict in our recreational areas.

A cold spring pushed bears into valley bottoms to look for emerging greenery.  We had several reports of grizzly bears and a few of black bears in communities between May and late September this year.  The Elk Valley and South Country is very rich grizzly bear habitat in close proximity to human developments.  Although tourism, trail use and development continue to increase, there has been a significant decrease in human caused bear mortality in 2017.

To date this year two grizzly bears were destroyed by residents in defence of property.  One grizzly bear in Elkford, three black bears in Rosen Lake, one black bear in Tie Lake and two cougars in Fernie had to be destroyed by the Conservation Officers due to human/wildlife conflict.  Overall the number of Problem Wildlife Occurrence Reports (PWOR’S) was low in residential areas and this can be attributed to a good berry crop and increased awareness regarding the management of wildlife attractants.  However, there was an increase in PWOR’s involving incidents between people and wildlife in recreational areas.  A mountain biker was bluff charged by a grizzly and cubs four times, a number of hikers reporting being bluff charged by grizzlies and cubs on popular trails, a hunter was attacked by a grizzly bear and several cougar sightings were reported on a popular trail and eventually had to be destroyed.

As the Elk Valley and South Country continue to grow and develop so does the importance of keeping garbage and other attractants inaccessible to wildlife, continuing educational efforts, promoting responsible trail use, enforcing bylaws and ensuring new developments remain safe for people and wildlife.   Thank you to our sponsors, partners, volunteers and all the residents and visitors who made an effort this season to remove wildlife attractants from their properties and to prevent human/wildlife conflict in recreational areas.

The WildSafeBC program will be going into hibernation until the spring.  Let’s keep working together to keep wildlife wild and communities safe.

Bears going into hibernation